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Fabric Fray - Can this be detected from a sample?

Started by baileyuph, February 02, 2020, 07:45:21 am

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baileyuph

Needless to say, I work with fabrics, read on sample information but still need to know if
there is a better way to evaluate fabric (before buying/ordering to work on a customer job).

I feel of the sample but doing that and reading (as stated), would like a "best analysis"
to avoid going ahead and ordering fabric subject to fray.

I just got an order that was polyester that felt tight but once going through the rigors
of getting a piece upholstered, it doesn't pass the test as well as is required.

Doyle

MinUph

You could always cut a strip off each direction of the sample and see how it hold up to pulling on the threads. This would be the only way to know for sure.
Paul
Minichillo's Upholstery
Website

baileyuph

Paul is right on "fabric fray" determination.

I got a small job in customer fabric and I tested it for fray like Paul advised and BINGO!  It worked -
testing for the fabric fray problem.

The job was done completed - looked great - but I didn't get into the fray potential test.

The experience taught me what to do going forward.

Maybe there is something one can do - but don't know what from documentation of fabric.  Oh!! How
I long for some of those great fabrics some years ago!

Thanks again for your input Paul.

Doyle

MinUph

Your welcome Doyle,
  There are some fabrics that you know will fray like Sunbrella. That's why it's cut with a hot knife.
Paul
Minichillo's Upholstery
Website

baileyuph

Hot Knife!

Now that makes a lot of sense!  Keeping the fray down (eliminating essentially) is paramount!

Great tip Paul!!

I guess one (in use) can use the knife to minimize the "over melt"?

The hot cut without too much melt is the desirable stroke.  I am sure the knife has an
accurate temp control.

Doyle

MinUph

Actually the hot knife has no thermostat at all. You hold the trigger to turn it on and let off when its hot. You being the thermostat.
Paul
Minichillo's Upholstery
Website

baileyuph

Interesting - well in a vague sense that is the way most of us would proceed with mechanical
or even a powered rotary cutter.  That is, if it is going easy (user reaction is to speed up) and the opposite - not so easy, then the user reaction is slow the pace.

Doyle